Friday, January 22, 2010

Thanks

I'd like to thank you for your well-placed outrage regarding the project fingering. I may print out your comments and leave them to protect my stitching next time I am wooed away by the sticky treats. But really, the woman who thought you had to give away the pattern because "who would stitch it?" People, that's funny. Don't make the poor woman feel worse than she did when she realized I heard her. (It is funny.) Oh sure, you resent that remark because you shelled out for And They Sinned.

I would also like to thank my kind readers who offered to send the color chart for the 16th C English Garden pattern. Just as it was waiting to be picked up by the mailman, I found mine. Because I finally finished unpacking. It was in the front pocket of the large suitcase stuck inside a magazine that I had taken out of my stitching bag. I'm such a dufus.

Anyway, I don't have much to show because I have been knitting a scarf. I had planned to knit this on the plane on the way to England but the Christmas Day bomber ruined everything. I wasn't sure I should take my crafts aboard with me, and I know England doesn't like you flying with knitting needles anyway. TSA is okay with it. (Interestingly, TSA is not down with the Clover cutters, which initially were the acceptable substitute for scissors.) (What I think they should do is get all the transportation authorities together and make international rules for what gets on and what doesn't. That way, I can take my tiny embroidery scissors both to Bermuda and back again. Or I can fly with a pack of John James needles from Philadelphia to London and then from London to Newcastle. Or we can all knit on flights.) (If they don't want to bother with making these decisions, let's fly by Israel's rules. You don't even need to take off your shoes at Ben Gurion International.)

For some reason, however, they do let you take your circular needles along to chaperon a 10-year-old's birthday party. Which is what I will be doing this evening. And if they're lucky, I won't turn the needles into a garrote.

10 comments:

Nic said...

Have fun at the party - hopefully there won't be too many sticky fingers ;o)

Anonymous said...

Okay, it's ironically funny because it's a gorgeous chart, free or not.

Are you picking on And They Sinned or just dodos that paid that much for a chart, overdyeds, and fabric? It has every sampler symbol known to man. Willow trees, birds, rabbits, nudes (although, chaste ones) etc.

dd

Kristen said...

What I think they should do is get all the transportation authorities together and make international rules for what gets on and what doesn't.

Here's something funny: after the newest rules were implemented (shoes to be x-rayed, no liquids, etc.), my company sent a bulletin to everyone to remind us of what we would be able to take along on business trips. There listed among the things that would be confiscated if found: Japanese throwing stars. Seriously, we all had a chuckle after reading that.

Diane said...

Before I even read the very end of your post, I was thinking that circular needles are something that Dexter should have in his bag of tricks. :)

doris said...

Hmmm ... 10-year-olds are on the border of being too damn smart for their britches (I know it's breeches, but think of it being said Texas-style). You'll just have to hold those needles up and say, "Don't make me..." Then they'll just laugh at you and forget to be naughty.

I completely agree with your international craft items rules. It's a pain deciding what we can take and what we can't. Some bitch in Bermuda is the proud owner of my lovely pair of tiny Tres Claveles scissors.

drea_dear said...

hmmmm - you can't fly with embroidery scissors? Nobody told the TSA people in Boise or Seattle last August, not to mention the flight attendant who looked right at me as I snipped a thread in-flight.

Oops. ;)

mainely stitching said...

International rules for flying with children (one's own) vary from airline to airline as well. We've had some interesting experiences in that regard. I'm all in favor of one set of rules for everyone, everywhere.

Terri(TerriBoog) said...

Yep, one set of rules would be the way to go. Heck, it differs from airport to airport in the US, much less internationally!

What better way to chaperone a birthday party of 10 year olds than with sharp needles? Perfect!

Jenna said...

I can understand TSA's problem with the Clover cutters. Supposedly you can break them open and access the razor blades directly. That could kill someone. Knitting needles? Not so much. Unless they are the circulars, which, as you already pointed out, could also be used to kill someone. I guess they have to try to think like a sicko and then they still won't be able to think of the things that desperate and clever people will come up with. Isn't it better to live with and look for the known possible weapons than push people to resort to the more exotic?

Michelle said...

Glad you found your missing color chart! And trust me, And They Sinned is a small drop in the bucket of outrageous purchases I've made. LOL! Can't wait to see that scarf - I need to get knitting again. I need a nice scarf, plus the bonus is I will have a weapon with me while I'm working on it. : )